Death, dosh and what the CQC knew

L1028442

An update to this post.

The CQC knew.

The ‘incident’ referred to here involves a man diagnosed with autism and epilepsy who drowned unsupervised in the bath in April 2016. He drowned. Alone, unsupervised in a bath.

cqc
The CQC re-inspected the ‘home’, found various failings and referred to Elric Eiffert’s death as an ‘incident’. They found inadequate, or no, risk assessments around epilepsy:
cqc1

They took no formal action despite identifying risks to life that ended in death.

Instead asking the provider to:

send us a report that says what action they are going to take.

Send us a report…

The CQC knew.

At the same time they knew LB drowned in a hospital bath three years before. A death that should have been, by then, high profile enough to make any provider or NHS Trust pay close attention to bathing risks for [‘”vulnerable”‘] people diagnosed with epilepsy.

The CQC knew.

At the same time they were conducting an investigation into the way in which NHS Trusts respond to unexpected deaths. The irony. The wanton, careless, unjoining of dots that demand to be joined. That scream to be joined. How much money is wasted on this shite? While people continue to lead impoverished lives or worse?

The CQC knew.

Today #7daysofaction launched a campaign focusing on the profit made from the incarceration of learning disabled people in assessment and treatment units.

Dosh or death. Death and dosh.

The CQC knew someone had drowned in the bath when they inspected that place on April 28 2016.

3 thoughts on “Death, dosh and what the CQC knew

  1. It makes you shudder af the thought of
    How they just seem to accept it as some sort of collateral damage of running a care home

  2. It’s stuff of horror films.
    What do these vulnerable people go through as they pass away? I can imagine them heading ‘carers’ gossiping in the distance, and remembering and wanting those they loved to hold them as they’re dying.
    Endless shame to all involved.

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