A week in lockdown: shiftiness and jogging on

Lockdown so far: I gave up drinking and started running. Couch to 5k. I gave up and started again. Baby drinking. And running. Badly.

Monday. NHS England said they weren’t going to publish the COVID19 death figures of learning disabled and/or autistic people. The data would be packaged in the 2021 Leder review. Leder 2021. While deaths continue. Unacknowledged.

Running. 1.5 minutes. 3 minutes. Week 3. The same run three times. A lot of walking.

Wednesday. A shift in position. The data would be bunged to Public Health England (PHE) for analysis. A masterclass in vagueness. Careless shiftiness. Rebecca Thomas wrote this piece quoting PHE Director, Dr John Newton.

‘More likely to have health problems…’ says Newton, casually revealing ignorance underpinned by prejudice. Grim combo in anyone. Terrifying in a senior public health figure. How in the actual hell on a mouldy cracker drizzled with stench cream can you direct Public Health England without a scooby about health inequalities?

‘Any findings will be considered’ he added, stating the bleeding obvious. Only there is no bleeding obvious for certain people. Only hard won baby steps which remain under the constant shadow of obliteration. Also in the piece, Tim Nichols fights for a seat for autistic people at the death stats table and the new Mencrap ‘leader’ chips in with a weak, throwaway ‘it’s unacceptable’. [Of course it’s unacceptable. Is this really what you get for a three figure salary?]

An anonymous, hate filled comment under the article was removed after intervention by people on twitter. ‘They bring it on themselves, getting special dispensation to go out more than other people, killing people by their actions…’ This is the gist. Paraphrased.

There is no bleeding obvious. There is no collective outrage around inciting hatred of certain people. COVID19 is like a lightening rod, generating viciously bright sparks illuminating what those in the know know. Have known for decades. And yet it still it takes pressure to make people turn their heads. To encourage people to see what is now grotesquely visible. A labour that never ceases, never eases. Despite the solid and equally committed collective of allies, self-advocates, families, education, health and social care staff, politicians, human rights specialists, journalists, academics and so on.

Thursday. A small group of these concerned citizens got in touch with some of a core of legal experts leading legal challenges to the current denting or worse of human rights. Could the decision to not publish the data be judicially reviewed? Apparently so. At the same time, Harriet Harman wrote to Hancock requesting the data be published:

Running. 1.5 minutes. 3 minutes. Consistent and steady. Well thought through. No sudden movesPlenty of walking.

Friday. The Medical Director of NHS England and Improvement [for certain people] said the data from acute hospitals would be published during the daily press briefing. No other news. No mention since. No update published online. Nothing.

This week local BBC ran a piece on Soundabout:

It is truly joyous. I catch the bus to work with Sam sometimes (had no idea he is such a fab singer). He works at Brookes at Harcourt Hill and catches the U1 because he likes the stop announcer’s voice. I’d never noticed her before. Have a watch with a cuppa, and maybe a choccy bic or two, and tell me some people don’t count.

Then think about the shoddy and slippery way some people’s deaths are treated. People who almost inevitably lead shortened lives because of the way they are treated in life.

[More on the legal action later.]